Words

Word of the Week

Word of the Week:

Cloy- verb (used with object), to weary by an excess of food, sweetness, pleaseure, etc.; surfeit; satiate.

Clare’s word request...only two months late. My bad.
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Word of the Week

I figure I should do a Word of the Week too since I haven't done one forever and have been circling a ton of words in my readings this week that are prime candidates...

Word of the Week:

Diktat- n., A harsh, punitive settlement or decree imposed unilaterally on a defeated nation, political party, etc.; any decree or authoritative statement.

It's exam week...so don't hold your breath on posts, either.
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Word of the Week

Word of the week:

Opprobrium- n., the disgrace or the reproach incurred by conduct considered outrageously shameful; infamy; a cause or object of such reproach.

From Friedrich A. Hayek's
The Road to Serfdom
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Word of the Week

Word of the week:

Nimby- n., not in my back yard; used to express opposition by local citizens to the locating in their neighborhood of a civi project, as a jail, garbage dump, or drug rehabilitation center, that, though needed by the larger community, is considered unsightly, dangerous, or likely to lead to decreased property values. Related form: Nimbyism

So I thought I was going to have a hard time finding this weeks word. Well, that all changed in government class today. While discussing whether or not private property is the last metaphysical right left these days (as claims Richard Weaver), a few classmates spoke all about nimbyism. Not knowing what that was, it earned the spot in the Word of the Week. Congratulations, nimbyism.
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Word of the Week

Word of the Week:

Prig- n., a person who displays or demands of others pointlessly precise conformity, fussiness about trivialities, or exaggerated propriety, especially in a self-righteous or irritating manner.

You can thank Richard Weaver's "Ideas Have Consequences" for that one.
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Word of the Week

Word of the week:

Simulacrum- n., a slight, unreal, or superficial likeness or semblance; an effigy, image, or representation.

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Word of the Week

Word of the week (two days late):

Pettifoggery- n., a quarrel about petty points; bicker.
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Word of the Week

Word of the week:

Smarmy- adj., excessively or unctuously flattering, ingratiating, servile, etc.; hypocritically, complacently ,or effusively earnest; unctuous.

Thanks to Clare Conroy for that one!

Happy Spring Break!
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Word of the Week

Word of the week:

Parsnip- noun, a plant, Pastinaca sativa, cultivated varieties of which have a large, whitish, edible root; the root of this plant.

So I was out of ideas for a word of the week this Monday, that is, until I ordered chinese food tonight. You can thank my fortune cookie for this one. "Hard words break no bones, fine words butter no parsnips". What the heck is that supposed to mean!?
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Word of the Week

Word of the Week:

Metaphysical- adj., pertaining to or of the nature of metaphysics; highly abstract, subtle, or abstruse; designating or pertaining to the poetry of an early group of 17th century English poets, notably John Donne, whose characteristic style is highly intellectual and philosophical and features intense use of conceits and turns of wit.
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Word of the Week

Word of the Week:

Sanguine- adj., cheerfully optimistic, hopeful, or confident; reddish, ruddy; bloody, blood-red.

I read this word all the time in government and have had no idea what it means.
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Word of the Week

This week's word (I'm bringing back Fletcher's ODW):

Surly- adj., churlishly rude or bad-tempered; unfriendly or hostile; menacingly irritable; dark or dismal; threatening.

So I had no idea what this word meant and I heard it twice in one week. I figured it was about time to learn it. Thanks to Will Carey, for describing himself as surly last weekend and a political strategist who describe John McCain as surly during his heated exchange with Mitt Romney during the debate.
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